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This is a Wednesday’s Wonderful Words post, in which I chose a word, well-know or otherwise, and discuss why I think it’s so wonderful.

Blog

[blɔg, blɒg]

noun

1. Informal  Full name: weblog or web log. A journal written on-line and accessible to users of the internet. A web site containing the writer’s or group of writers’ own experiences, observations, opinions, etc., and often having images and links to other web sites.

verb (used without object)

2. To maintain or add new entries to a blog

Etymology

1998, short for weblog (which is attested from 1994, though not in the sense ‘online journal’), from (World Wide) Web + log. Joe Bloggs (c.1969) was British slang for “any hypothetical person” (cf. U.S. equivalent Joe Blow); earlier it meant “a servant”

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The English language is full of words which are 1 syllable long.

In that sentence alone, 9 out of 12 words contained only one syllable.

But blog‘s better than full or which. It deserves more respect. It deserves its own blog post.

Firstly, the word is strangely onomatopoeic.

Not in the same way as crash or tap are; it’s hard to capture the sound of someone blogging in a word. It’s more than typing, it’s thinking and pouring your heart into something. It’s also a bit of a word vomit. You sit in front of your computer and type the words which come into your head, and then, in a few hundred words, you’re left with a post. Blog captures this sense of immediacy. There are no editors or proof readers, at least not in the way a magazine or novel.

If you say the word repeatedly, it begins to sound wrong.

Blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog blog.

Not right.

It’s also beautiful because it’s an example of the fluid condition of the English language. New words, be they abbreviations, as blog is, portmanteaux of other words or loan words from another language, are being added every day. The reluctance of the Oxford English Dictionary to permit these newfangled words in doesn’t mean their not words. In fact, more and more of these words are being let in, are being allowed the status of Proper Words.

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